Mototaxis: The Amazon Jungle Transport

Mototaxis: The Amazon Jungle Transport

When thinking of movement in Amazonia, river transport probably comes to mind. Being home to the longest river in the world, with countless tributaries, it is certainly true that a myriad boats - ranging from dugout canoes to narrow peke-peke speedboats to luxury cruise ships - ply the waterways, carrying people and supplies.

And yet, when you step out of the airport in Iquitos, Tarapoto, Pucallpa, or any city in Peru's Amazon, you will be struck by the sight - and sound - of another form of transport: the mototaxi, which will generally outnumber cars by at least five to one.

Guano - Peru's White Gold

Guano - Peru's White Gold

Guano (seabird droppings) covers the coastal islands and cliffs of Peru in a thick,
odiferous, white layer. Derived from the Quechua word huanu (manure), guano has
been used as a natural, nitrate-rich fertilizer since pre-Inca times. The sunny atmosphere of the coast bakes in the nitrates, and lack of rain ensures that the droppings are not washed away.

Pisco Sour Day

Pisco Sour Day

In 2003, Peru created El Dia Nacional del Pisco Sour (National Pisco Sour Day), an annual public holiday on the first Saturday of February, celebrating the tangy, sweet - and undeniably intoxicating - Peruvian cocktail, which is both delicious and addictive!

This concoction of Pisco, lemon juice, egg white and sugar syrup liquidized, and served with a dash of Angostura bitters, has a long history dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the Americas.

Why is Peru suffering coastal landslides and flooding?

Why is Peru suffering coastal landslides and flooding?

To date, 94 people have died, and an estimated 700,000 have been left homeless, as a direct result of the landslides and flooding, brought on by unusually heavy rains on the Western side of the Andes.

What, then, is causing all this destruction? To understand this, we need to look at Peru's coastal climate which, in a similar way to southern California, blends strong desert and offshore influences.

Peruvian Paso Horses

Peruvian Paso Horses

Descended from North African and Spanish stock, caballos de Paso are mid-sized horses bred for sure-footedness and comfort, not for speed. Unlike trotting breeds, Paso horses pace smoothly with little up-and- down movement, resulting in an exceptionally comfortable ride. As a result, they are tough and well-suited to demanding trips into the rough, dry, and expansive western Andes. Today, they are considered the smoothest saddle horses in the world.