Iquitos

Amazon Cuisine - Juanes

Amazon Cuisine - Juanes

Juanes is a traditional dish widely consumed throughout the Peruvian Amazon, especially the High Amazon

It is designed for travelling: pre-cooked food that is wrapped in a leaf, normally from the endemic Cachibou tree (Calathea lutea) - known locally as bijao - which acts as a picnic box for the contents. The leaf also infuses the food with a subtle, but distinctive flavour. 

New Addition to Historic Boat Museum - B.A.P America

New Addition to Historic Boat Museum - B.A.P America

Since December 2015, the Historic Boat Museum of Iquitos has had a highly significant addition to her armada: the second oldest gunboat in the world, B.A.P. America.

Built in Birkenhead, England in 1904, in order to serve in Peru’s Amazon flotilla, she measures 41 m (135 ft) in length and 6 m (20 ft) in width. 

Yagua Indigenous Amazonian Tribe

Yagua Indigenous Amazonian Tribe

If visiting an Amazon lodge downstream from Iquitos, chances are that you will get the chance to visit the Yagua village of Nuevo Peru. This is a tourism experience, undoubtedly, but offers a starting point to understand a little more about one of Amazonia’s larger indigenous groups. 

Visiting an 'Indigenous' Village - Good or Bad?

Visiting an 'Indigenous' Village - Good or Bad?

We recently received a comment from clients saying that 'a visit to an Indian community ... left us feeling rather uncomfortable: they performed a dance and then sold us trinkets, but we felt quite ambivalent about the whole set-up'. The community in question was that of an Amazonian tribe, the Yagua, visited as part of the Ceiba Tops - and many other Amazon lodge - itineraries. 

In this blog, we examine the pros and cons of these visits. 

Shipibo-Konibo Indians

Shipibo-Konibo Indians

It is estimated that Peru's Amazon is home to 16 language families and around 65 ethnic groups. That this is only an estimate is testament to the vast area of Peru covered by dense Amazon rain forest, in which there are still 'uncontacted' tribes. 

One indigenous people that you are likely to come across are the Shipibo-Konibo, who have traditionally lived along the Ucayali River.

Downriver From Iquitos

Downriver From Iquitos

These days, nearly all Amazon river cruises travel upstream from Iquitos to the confluence of the Ucayali and Marañon Rivers, and the Pacaya-Samiria Reserve. However, when I first took one of these cruises, in the year 2002, the Rio Amazonas took me and my group downstream to the tri-border with Colombia and Brazil. It remains a very interesting - albeit busier - river journey, which can be visited using local transport or by chartering your own vessel.