Viringos - Peru's Hairless Dog

Viringos - Peru's Hairless Dog

Except for a tuft between their ears and on the end of their tail, these medium-sized, dark Peruvian dogs are completely hairless. In spite of their unorthodox looks - or perhaps because of them - viringo dogs were prized by the Moche, Chimu and Virus cultures, who included them as sacrifices in many important burials, and depicted them on painted pottery.

Hike to Yumbilla Waterfall

Hike to Yumbilla Waterfall

One of PeruNorth's first forays into Northern Peru was in 2006, to see first-hand Catarata Gocta, which had just been claimed as the third-highest waterfall in the world. At that time, we learned that Gocta was just one of many drops from this one plateau in the Amazonas province.

In the subsequent years, another of these waterfalls, Yumbilla, had been surveyed by Peru's Geographical Institute (IGN), and found to have a total drop 125 m (407 ft) higher than Gocta. So, it went to top of our list of must-see natural attractions.

Mototaxis: The Amazon Jungle Transport

Mototaxis: The Amazon Jungle Transport

When thinking of movement in Amazonia, river transport probably comes to mind. Being home to the longest river in the world, with countless tributaries, it is certainly true that a myriad boats - ranging from dugout canoes to narrow peke-peke speedboats to luxury cruise ships - ply the waterways, carrying people and supplies.

And yet, when you step out of the airport in Iquitos, Tarapoto, Pucallpa, or any city in Peru's Amazon, you will be struck by the sight - and sound - of another form of transport: the mototaxi, which will generally outnumber cars by at least five to one.

Guano - Peru's White Gold

Guano - Peru's White Gold

Guano (seabird droppings) covers the coastal islands and cliffs of Peru in a thick,
odiferous, white layer. Derived from the Quechua word huanu (manure), guano has
been used as a natural, nitrate-rich fertilizer since pre-Inca times. The sunny atmosphere of the coast bakes in the nitrates, and lack of rain ensures that the droppings are not washed away.

Pisco Sour Day

Pisco Sour Day

In 2003, Peru created El Dia Nacional del Pisco Sour (National Pisco Sour Day), an annual public holiday on the first Saturday of February, celebrating the tangy, sweet - and undeniably intoxicating - Peruvian cocktail, which is both delicious and addictive!

This concoction of Pisco, lemon juice, egg white and sugar syrup liquidized, and served with a dash of Angostura bitters, has a long history dating back to the arrival of the Spanish in the Americas.